Production of insulated joints

There are two types of insulated joints S (Schmitz) and MT (Münch-Thermit).
There are basically two types of insulated MT joints, simple and reinforced. Reinforced insulated joints should, however, only be used with S 49 and S 54 type rails. Here is a brief description of how an insulated MT joint is produced.

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

The rail should be cut and also drilled in the necessary dimensions (drilled hole spacing). The mating surfaces of the fishplates should be freed from rust and also be cleaned, so that a clean bonding of the resin adhesive can take place.

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

After the completion of the preparatory work, both rail ends should be aligned in height and direction with a steel ruler. The joint insert can then also be put in and fixed in position.  

The synthetic resin mortar can now be mixed and applied wedge-shaped to the inner sides of the insulating fish plates. Please observe the safety instructions when dealing with the adhesive; respiratory protection masks should be worn.

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

The fish plates can now be attached, the insulation rolls put in and screwed together with the fish-plate screws, washers and nuts.

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

First of all, the two inner and then the two outer fish plate screws are tightened with a power drill (Knattermax) and tightened with a torque wrench to 1 kNm.

After a period of approximately 30 minutes the insulating joint should be checked again with a torque wrench and if necessary retightened.

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

by Thorsten Schaeffer
© Thorsten Schaeffer

You can find suitable specialist literature to the topic here:

The Basic Principles of Mechanised Track Maintenance

The Basic Principles of Mechanised Track Maintenance

This book is dedicated to the many people involved in the day to day planning and performance of track maintenance activities. Providing a practical approach to everyday challenges in mechanised track maintenance, it is not just intended as a theoretical approach to the track system. 
Railways aim at transporting people and freight safely, rapidly, regularly, comfortably and on time from one place to another. This book is directed to track infrastructure departments contributing to the above objective by ensuring the track infrastructure’s reliability, availability, maintainability and safety – denoted by the acronym RAMS. Regular, effective and affordable track maintenance enable RAMS to be achieved.

Best Practice in Track Maintenance, Vol 1 - Infrastructure Management

Infrastructure Management Volume 1 looks at aspects of infrastructure management with particular reference to the single European railway area. Based on best-practice examples from Central Europe, measures for the targeted retrofitting and improvement of the infrastructure maintenance of the existing network are presented. In many cases, infrastructure operators are faced with a generational change, which accelerates the process. Modern information and communication technology can simplify the comprehension and presentation of complex contexts. Modified approaches to asset management and life-cycle management enable implementation of the "transparent permanent way" or the "railway 4.0".